News

A Dazzling Evening at Hospice’s Dream Makers’ Ball

On Thursday 7 March an unforgettable celebration took place at Goodwood House to mark the success of the St Wilfrid’s Hospice DREAMBUILDING appeal for a new hospice in Bosham.

The Dream Makers’ Ball was a sell-out VIP evening, a final fundraising event marking the official end of the DREAMBUILDING campaign. The campaign began in November 2015 to generate the £16.2 million needed to fund the state-of-the-art new facility. The Ball itself raised nearly £60,000 on the night, from ticket sales, a Silent Auction and a Raffle, bringing the remaining funds needed down to £600,000.  

The guests (including their Graces the Duke and Duchess of Richmond and Gordon) enjoyed champagne and canapés on arrival, a three-course dinner, wine, music, dancing and entertainment from London's sleekest classical-crossover girl group - The IDA Girls.

The Silent Auction and Raffle offered many generously donated prizes including holidays, dining experiences, tickets to Wimbledon, a behind the scenes tour of Rolls Royce Motor Cars at Goodwood, and a bronze maquette by sculptor Philip Jackson CVO.

Master of ceremony duties were conducted by local best-selling author Kate Mosse, who had admirably journeyed directly to the event from the paperback launch of her No1 bestselling novel, The Burning Chambers, in Norwich that very same afternoon.

St Wilfrid’s Chief Executive, Alison Moorey, commented, “We are extremely grateful to all our supporters, donors and  sponsors; Goodwood House, Chilgrove Gin and Southdowns Water who made the evening such a success. We welcome this whole new era for St Wilfrid’s with tremendous gratitude and enthusiasm. We look forward to welcoming the local community when we open our new doors in June.”

To help St Wilfrid’s count down that last, much needed, £600,000 please visit www.dreambuilding.org.uk  or call 01243 775302 to make a donation.

Your donations will allow St Wilfrid’s to further develop their specialist care and support services, both on and off site, so they can continue to meet the growing and changing needs of local people living with terminal illnesses.